Un microbiote. Un microbiote est défini lorsqu'un ensemble de micro-organismes vit dans un écosystème précis. Par exemple, nos intestins abritent leur propre microbiote. “On parle d'une grande diversité d'espèces (bactéries, champignons, etc.) auxquelles on peut ajouter les virus. Derrière cette grande diversité d'espèces se cache une grande diversité de fonctions, relativement centrales au fonctionnement des écosystèmes” explique Christophe Mougel.
Professor Alan Boobis OBE, Toxicologist, Division of Medicine, Imperial College London states that "The body’s own detoxification systems are remarkably sophisticated and versatile. They have to be, as the natural environment that we evolved in is hostile. It is remarkable that people are prepared to risk seriously disrupting these systems with unproven ‘detox’ diets, which could well do more harm than good."[11]
In addition to safety risks, many jobs also present risks of disease, illness and other long-term health problems. Among the most common occupational diseases are various forms of pneumoconiosis, including silicosis and coal worker's pneumoconiosis (black lung disease). Asthma is another respiratory illness that many workers are vulnerable to. Workers may also be vulnerable to skin diseases, including eczema, dermatitis, urticaria, sunburn, and skin cancer.[57][58] Other occupational diseases of concern include carpal tunnel syndrome and lead poisoning.

Various modalities of body cleansing are currently employed, ranging from physical treatments (e.g. colon cleansing), to dietary restrictions (i.e. avoiding foods) or dietary supplements. Some variants involve the use of herbs and supplements that purportedly speed or increase the effectiveness of the process of cleansing. Several naturopathic and homeopathic preparations are also promoted for cleansing; such products are often marketed as targeting specific organs, such as fiber for the colon or juices for the kidneys.
Directeur de recherche à l'Institut Génétique Environnement et Protection des plantes de Rennes, Christophe Mougel étudie les phytobiomes (l'association des plantes, de leur environnement de croissance et de leur microbiote), une toute nouvelle vision de la plante en tant qu'écosystème, ou en tant que “super organisme végétal”, comme il le décrit. Les travaux de son Institut consistent à mieux comprendre le rôle des microbiotes et leurs fonctions au sein des espèces végétales. Il s'agit de décrire et de comprendre ce lien en vue notamment de développer “une agriculture de précision voire une agriculture personnalisée à l'échelle d'une exploitation”, comme l'explique M. Mougel.
Directeur de recherche à l'Institut Génétique Environnement et Protection des plantes de Rennes, Christophe Mougel étudie les phytobiomes (l'association des plantes, de leur environnement de croissance et de leur microbiote), une toute nouvelle vision de la plante en tant qu'écosystème, ou en tant que “super organisme végétal”, comme il le décrit. Les travaux de son Institut consistent à mieux comprendre le rôle des microbiotes et leurs fonctions au sein des espèces végétales. Il s'agit de décrire et de comprendre ce lien en vue notamment de développer “une agriculture de précision voire une agriculture personnalisée à l'échelle d'une exploitation”, comme l'explique M. Mougel.
This article was co-authored by Lisa Bryant, ND. Dr. Lisa Bryant is Licensed Naturopathic Physician and natural medicine expert based in Portland, Oregon. She earned a Doctorate of Naturopathic Medicine from the National College of Natural Medicine in Portland, Oregon and completed her residency in Naturopathic Family Medicine there in 2014. This article has been viewed 2,974,726 times.
×