Directeur de recherche à l'Institut Génétique Environnement et Protection des plantes de Rennes, Christophe Mougel étudie les phytobiomes (l'association des plantes, de leur environnement de croissance et de leur microbiote), une toute nouvelle vision de la plante en tant qu'écosystème, ou en tant que “super organisme végétal”, comme il le décrit. Les travaux de son Institut consistent à mieux comprendre le rôle des microbiotes et leurs fonctions au sein des espèces végétales. Il s'agit de décrire et de comprendre ce lien en vue notamment de développer “une agriculture de précision voire une agriculture personnalisée à l'échelle d'une exploitation”, comme l'explique M. Mougel.

The environment is often cited as an important factor influencing the health status of individuals. This includes characteristics of the natural environment, the built environment and the social environment. Factors such as clean water and air, adequate housing, and safe communities and roads all have been found to contribute to good health, especially to the health of infants and children.[13][24] Some studies have shown that a lack of neighborhood recreational spaces including natural environment leads to lower levels of personal satisfaction and higher levels of obesity, linked to lower overall health and well being.[25] It has been demonstrated that increased time spent in natural environments is associated with improved self-reported health [26], suggesting that the positive health benefits of natural space in urban neighborhoods should be taken into account in public policy and land use.
Finally, while many testimonial and anecdotal accounts exist of health improvements following a "detox", these are more likely attributable to the placebo effect; where people actually believe that they are doing something good and healthy. Yet, there is a severe lack of quantitative data. Some changes recommended in certain "detox" lifestyles are also found in mainstream medical advice (such as consuming a diet high in fruits and vegetables). These changes can often produce beneficial effects in and of themselves, and it is accordingly difficult to separate these effects from those caused by the more controversial detoxification recommendations.
In the first decade of the 21st century, the conceptualization of health as an ability opened the door for self-assessments to become the main indicators to judge the performance of efforts aimed at improving human health.[11] It also created the opportunity for every person to feel healthy, even in the presence of multiple chronic diseases, or a terminal condition, and for the re-examination of determinants of health, away from the traditional approach that focuses on the reduction of the prevalence of diseases.[12]
Just as there was a shift from viewing disease as a state to thinking of it as a process, the same shift happened in definitions of health. Again, the WHO played a leading role when it fostered the development of the health promotion movement in the 1980s. This brought in a new conception of health, not as a state, but in dynamic terms of resiliency, in other words, as "a resource for living". 1984 WHO revised the definition of health defined it as "the extent to which an individual or group is able to realize aspirations and satisfy needs and to change or cope with the environment. Health is a resource for everyday life, not the objective of living; it is a positive concept, emphasizing social and personal resources, as well as physical capacities".[5] Thus, health referred to the ability to maintain homeostasis and recover from insults. Mental, intellectual, emotional and social health referred to a person's ability to handle stress, to acquire skills, to maintain relationships, all of which form resources for resiliency and independent living.[4] This opens up many possibilities for health to be taught, strengthened and learned.
Skip juice cleanses or liquid diets. A popular cleansing regimen for losing weight involves drinking only juice or another type of liquid for a few days to a week. This is dangerous because you could end up without essential nutrients. These extreme cleanses are also counterproductive because most people just gain back any weight they lost when they go back to eating normal food again. Doctors don't recommend any sort of diet like this, and say following a healthy diet and exercise routine is much better for losing weight.[15]
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