Various modalities of body cleansing are currently employed, ranging from physical treatments (e.g. colon cleansing), to dietary restrictions (i.e. avoiding foods) or dietary supplements. Some variants involve the use of herbs and supplements that purportedly speed or increase the effectiveness of the process of cleansing. Several naturopathic and homeopathic preparations are also promoted for cleansing; such products are often marketed as targeting specific organs, such as fiber for the colon or juices for the kidneys.

L’Inrae (Institut national de recherche pour l'agriculture, l'alimentation et l'environnement) a récemment fait le point sur les recherches en cours issues du mouvement One Health - une seule santé. Dans un contexte délicat, l’approche One Health vise à impliquer l’ensemble des acteurs de la santé humaine, animale et environnementale dans une réflexion commune.

The meaning of health has evolved over time. In keeping with the biomedical perspective, early definitions of health focused on the theme of the body's ability to function; health was seen as a state of normal function that could be disrupted from time to time by disease. An example of such a definition of health is: "a state characterized by anatomic, physiologic, and psychological integrity; ability to perform personally valued family, work, and community roles; ability to deal with physical, biological, psychological, and social stress".[2] Then in 1948, in a radical departure from previous definitions, the World Health Organization (WHO) proposed a definition that aimed higher: linking health to well-being, in terms of "physical, mental, and social well-being, and not merely the absence of disease and infirmity".[3] Although this definition was welcomed by some as being innovative, it was also criticized as being vague, excessively broad and was not construed as measurable. For a long time, it was set aside as an impractical ideal and most discussions of health returned to the practicality of the biomedical model.[4]
Personal health depends partially on the active, passive, and assisted cues people observe and adopt about their own health. These include personal actions for preventing or minimizing the effects of a disease, usually a chronic condition, through integrative care. They also include personal hygiene practices to prevent infection and illness, such as bathing and washing hands with soap; brushing and flossing teeth; storing, preparing and handling food safely; and many others. The information gleaned from personal observations of daily living – such as about sleep patterns, exercise behavior, nutritional intake and environmental features – may be used to inform personal decisions and actions (e.g., "I feel tired in the morning so I am going to try sleeping on a different pillow"), as well as clinical decisions and treatment plans (e.g., a patient who notices his or her shoes are tighter than usual may be having exacerbation of left-sided heart failure, and may require diuretic medication to reduce fluid overload).[53]
Many governments view occupational health as a social challenge and have formed public organizations to ensure the health and safety of workers. Examples of these include the British Health and Safety Executive and in the United States, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, which conducts research on occupational health and safety, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which handles regulation and policy relating to worker safety and health.[59][60][61]
Personal health also depends partially on the social structure of a person's life. The maintenance of strong social relationships, volunteering, and other social activities have been linked to positive mental health and also increased longevity. One American study among seniors over age 70, found that frequent volunteering was associated with reduced risk of dying compared with older persons who did not volunteer, regardless of physical health status.[54] Another study from Singapore reported that volunteering retirees had significantly better cognitive performance scores, fewer depressive symptoms, and better mental well-being and life satisfaction than non-volunteering retirees.[55]
“Le mouvement One Health (“une seule santé”), initié au début des années 2000, fait suite à la recrudescence et à l'émergence de maladies infectieuses, en raison notamment de la mondialisation des échanges. Le principe [de One Health] est simple : la protection de la santé de l'Homme passe par la santé de l'animal et celle de l'ensemble des écosystèmes”, peut-on lire sur le site de l'Inrae. Alors que nous traversons une période de pandémie mondiale, comme l'explique Philippe Mauguin, PDG de l'Inrae, il est important de rappeler que 60 % des maladies infectieuses humaines proviennent du monde animal : c'est la zoonose. De plus, 70 % de ces maladies nous sont transmises par les animaux sauvages. L'objectif de cet Institut qui a vu le jour en janvier 2020, au travers de One Health, est de démontrer le lien entre la dégradation de la biodiversité et l'émergence de ces nouvelles zoonoses. Pour cela, plusieurs départements et unités de recherche de l'Inrae consacrent leurs études aux facteurs de dégradation et des pressions imposées sur l'ensemble des écosystèmes. “La problématique des conséquences directes et indirectes de différents facteurs de l'environnement sur les santés [...] est un sujet de préoccupation pour l'Inrae”, explique Thierry Caquet, Directeur Scientifique-Environnement de l'Institut.

Since the late 1970s, the federal Healthy People Initiative has been a visible component of the United States’ approach to improving population health.[6][7] In each decade, a new version of Healthy People is issued,[8] featuring updated goals and identifying topic areas and quantifiable objectives for health improvement during the succeeding ten years, with assessment at that point of progress or lack thereof. Progress has been limited to many objectives, leading to concerns about the effectiveness of Healthy People in shaping outcomes in the context of a decentralized and uncoordinated US health system. Healthy People 2020 gives more prominence to health promotion and preventive approaches and adds a substantive focus on the importance of addressing social determinants of health. A new expanded digital interface facilitates use and dissemination rather than bulky printed books as produced in the past. The impact of these changes to Healthy People will be determined in the coming years.[9]
Mental illness is described as 'the spectrum of cognitive, emotional, and behavioral conditions that interfere with social and emotional well-being and the lives and productivity of people. Having a mental illness can seriously impair, temporarily or permanently, the mental functioning of a person. Other terms include: 'mental health problem', 'illness', 'disorder', 'dysfunction'.[33]
Various modalities of body cleansing are currently employed, ranging from physical treatments (e.g. colon cleansing), to dietary restrictions (i.e. avoiding foods) or dietary supplements. Some variants involve the use of herbs and supplements that purportedly speed or increase the effectiveness of the process of cleansing. Several naturopathic and homeopathic preparations are also promoted for cleansing; such products are often marketed as targeting specific organs, such as fiber for the colon or juices for the kidneys.
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