^ Housman & Dorman 2005, pp. 303–04. "The linear model supported previous findings, including regular exercise, limited alcohol consumption, abstinence from smoking, sleeping 7–8 hours a night, and maintenance of a healthy weight play an important role in promoting longevity and delaying illness and death." Citing Wingard DL, Berkman LF, Brand RJ (1982). "A multivariate analysis of health-related practices: a nine-year mortality follow-up of the Alameda County Study". Am J Epidemiol. 116 (5): 765–75. doi:10.1093/oxfordjournals.aje.a113466. PMID 7148802.

Sleep is an essential component to maintaining health. In children, sleep is also vital for growth and development. Ongoing sleep deprivation has been linked to an increased risk for some chronic health problems. In addition, sleep deprivation has been shown to correlate with both increased susceptibility to illness and slower recovery times from illness.[43] In one study, people with chronic insufficient sleep, set as six hours of sleep a night or less, were found to be four times more likely to catch a cold compared to those who reported sleeping for seven hours or more a night.[44] Due to the role of sleep in regulating metabolism, insufficient sleep may also play a role in weight gain or, conversely, in impeding weight loss.[45] Additionally, in 2007, the International Agency for Research on Cancer, which is the cancer research agency for the World Health Organization, declared that "shiftwork that involves circadian disruption is probably carcinogenic to humans," speaking to the dangers of long-term nighttime work due to its intrusion on sleep.[46] In 2015, the National Sleep Foundation released updated recommendations for sleep duration requirements based on age and concluded that "Individuals who habitually sleep outside the normal range may be exhibiting signs or symptoms of serious health problems or, if done volitionally, may be compromising their health and well-being."[47]

Le département de Santé Animale de l'Institut, dirigé par Muriel Vayssier-Taussat, étudie les interactions entre la santé animale et humaine. “Pour préserver la santé de l'Homme, une des voies est de préserver la santé animale” explique-t-elle. Mais cette protection ne doit pas être menée n'importe comment. Ces dernières années, il a été observé que la résistance aux antibiotiques avait largement augmenté chez de nombreux animaux dû à un usage massif. Ceci contribue à l'apparition de nouveaux virus plus résistants et donc potentiellement plus facilement transmissibles à l'Homme. L'unité Génétique Animale et Biologie Intégrative, dirigée par Claire Rogel-Gaillard, se consacre à l'étude de la diversité génomique en élevage, et son lien avec les santés : “Comment sélectionner des animaux qui vont être en bonne santé [...] tout en limitant l'usage d'anti-infectieux et en réduisant l'empreinte environnementale ? Il y a en fait un lien assez fort entre la durabilité des systèmes d'élevage et la santé des Hommes et animaux de la Terre.” A l'aide de travaux sur la variabilité individuelle des réponses immunitaires (aux maladies et aux vaccins) sur les animaux d'élevage, Mme Rogel-Gaillard explique qu'il “n'existe pas d'animal complètement optimal dans toutes les conditions et dans tous les environnements [...]. Une génétique optimale dans un environnement peut ne pas être optimale dans un autre.” 


Many governments view occupational health as a social challenge and have formed public organizations to ensure the health and safety of workers. Examples of these include the British Health and Safety Executive and in the United States, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, which conducts research on occupational health and safety, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which handles regulation and policy relating to worker safety and health.[59][60][61]
In addition to safety risks, many jobs also present risks of disease, illness and other long-term health problems. Among the most common occupational diseases are various forms of pneumoconiosis, including silicosis and coal worker's pneumoconiosis (black lung disease). Asthma is another respiratory illness that many workers are vulnerable to. Workers may also be vulnerable to skin diseases, including eczema, dermatitis, urticaria, sunburn, and skin cancer.[57][58] Other occupational diseases of concern include carpal tunnel syndrome and lead poisoning.
Many governments view occupational health as a social challenge and have formed public organizations to ensure the health and safety of workers. Examples of these include the British Health and Safety Executive and in the United States, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, which conducts research on occupational health and safety, and the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which handles regulation and policy relating to worker safety and health.[59][60][61]
Making the decision to cleanse your body is great! It shows that you’re taking your health seriously and trying to make positive changes. However, rather than trying cleansing plans, doctors recommend living an overall healthier lifestyle instead. There’s really just no substitute for a healthy diet, regular exercise, lots of sleep, and cutting out harmful habits like smoking and drinking. By making these changes, you can successfully cleanse your body and enjoy the benefits.
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